Theories-in-Use and Reflection-in-Action: Core Principles for LIS Education


Edwards, P (2010)
JELIS (51,1) p. 18-29

Abstract
This article examines the extent to which two concepts from research on organizational learning—theories-in-use and reflection-in-action—could align with typical learning outcomes associated with LIS education. Two illustrative case studies are considered: one from an undergraduate-level course on search strategies and one from a graduate-level course in collection development. Based on the kinds of classroom experiences that are reported to be most valuable to students, these concepts appear to be useful for designing and assessing the effectiveness of activities, exercises, and assignments. Student feedback from these two cases, while not universally positive, is suggestive of the utility of these concepts as guiding principles for instructional design and evaluation in the context of LIS education.